Admissions Office
The College of St. Scholastica
1200 Kenwood Avenue
Duluth, MN 55811
(218) 723-6046
(800) 249-6412
TTY/TDD: (218) 723-6790
admissions@css.edu

Sandy Marden-Lokken, PT, Ed.D.
Interim Department Chair
Science Center, Room 3125K
(218) 723-6090
slokken@css.edu

Pre-Physical Therapy

Fast Facts: Pre-Physical Therapy 

  • Students interested in pursuing a career in physical therapy will need to declare an undergraduate major while ensuring they complete the prerequisite coursework needed for physical therapy graduate education.
  • St. Scholastica's pre-PT advisors work with students to identify the courses needed to gain acceptance into physical therapy graduate school.
  • Students accepted by physical therapy graduate programs come from a variety of majors, however the most common or complementary majors for St. Scholastica pre-PT majors are exercise physiology, psychology, biology and health humanities.
  • St. Scholastica offers a doctor of physical therapy (DPT) program. We give priority review to DPT applicants with a CSS undergraduate degree. Priority review does not mean guaranteed admission.
  • St. Scholastica's PT Club gives students an opportunity to network with other undergraduate pre-PT students and also with students and faculty within our DPT program.

Careers

The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that between 2010 and 2020, physical therapist employment will increase by 39 percent. Not only is demand high for physical therapists, salaries are too. The median annual salary for an entry level PT position is about $76,000. Additionally, physical therapists can find employment in so many venues:  hospitals, clinics, nursing care facilities, outpatient care centers, private practice settings, rehab centers, home healthcare agencies, and academic and research settings.

Pair with a language

Boost your brain power and give yourself a competitive edge in our global economy by pairing your major with a language. St. Scholastica offers programs and courses in American Sign Language, French, German, Latin, Ojibwe, Russian and Spanish.

Prerequisite coursework 

Here are the prerequisite courses you need to take in preparation for graduate school. This list doesn't necessarily include courses needed for your major or general education requirements. Be sure to create your course plan in consultation with your advisor.

Course Creation Center

Expand and Collapse Coursework

Expand and Collapse BIO 1036 - Biology of the Cell

Introduction to cell biology, intended for students who are not majoring in the natural sciences (biology majors take BIO 1110 and 1120). Topics include the study of structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; study of the structure, function and behavior of cells; an introduction to cellular metabolism. 2 class hours.

Expand and Collapse BIO 2110 - Anatomy and Physiology I

Introductory study of anatomy and physiology of the vertebrate body with an emphasis on the human. Topics include an introduction to cells, tissues, and systems organization, osteology, fluid compartments, gross and microscopic anatomy, physiology of the circulatory system, body defense systems and the gross anatomy of musculature. 3 class hours, 3-hour lab. Prerequisite: BIO 1110 or BIO 1036.

Expand and Collapse BIO 2120 - Anatomy and Physiology II

Continuation of BIO 2110. Topics include gross and microscopic anatomy, physiology of the renal system, respiratory system, digestive system, nervous system and endocrine system. 3 class hours, 3-hour lab. Prerequisite: BIO 2110.

Expand and Collapse CHM 1110 - General Chemistry I

Introduces atomic and molecular structure, bonding, stoichiometry, gas laws, chemical periodicity, and equilibrium. Three 50-minute lectures, one 2-hour lab each week. Prerequisite: high school chemistry and appropriate placement test score.

Expand and Collapse CHM 1120 - General Chemistry II

Studies solutions, equilibria, coordination chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: C- or higher in CHM 1110.

Expand and Collapse HSC 2209 - Medical Terminology

Study of the terminology common to medicine utilizing word elements (prefixes, suffixes and roots) basic for building medical terms and analyzing meanings using a programmed learning format; includes spelling and pronunciation of medical terms.

Expand and Collapse PSC 2001 - Physics I

Covers algebra-based general physics including Newtonian mechanics (motion, force, energy, momentum), harmonic motion, fluids, and thermodynamics. Students must have ease and familiarity with basic algebraic and trigonometric techniques. Includes one 2-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A grade of C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) or better in College Algebra (MATH 1111) or a C or better in a more advanced college math course or a math ACT score of 24 or higher or by permission of the instructor.

Expand and Collapse PSC 2002 - Physics II

Continues the study of algebra-based general physics including content in electricity and magnetism, geometric optics, sound and light waves, and selected topics in modern physics. Includes one 2-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A grade of C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) or better in PSC 2001.

Expand and Collapse PSY 2208 - Lifespan Developmental PSY

Cognitive, personality/social, and physical development from conception to death. Within a life span developmental perspective, the course examines research methods, developmental theories, and application of research findings to selected problems in the major periods of the life span: the prenatal period, infancy, early/middle/late childhood, adolescence, and young/middle/late adulthood. The developmental perspective provides an important foundation for understanding normal children and adults, while also providing the essential knowledge base for the modern view of psychological disturbances as "normal development gone awry." This approach has practical implications for individuals with interests in parenting, caregiving, education, social services, and health sciences with both normal and exceptional populations. Prerequisite: none, but sophomore standing recommended.

Expand and Collapse PSY 3331 - Statistics

Covers basic statistical concepts and methods useful in conducting research and evaluating results of studies done by others. Topics include frequency distributions and graphs, measures of central tendency and variability, transformed scores, correlations, multiple regression, hypothesis testing (t test, analysis of variance, and chi square), selection of appropriate statistics, calculation with MS Excel spreadsheets and SPSS, interpretation of the "results" sections of journal articles, and numeracy (understanding and using numbers in decision-making). Prerequisite: competence in arithmetic.

Expand and Collapse PSY 3423 - Abnormal Psychology

Provides an overview of what is considered to be abnormal behavior in American society. The main focus of the course is on describing various mental disorders and discussing how these disorders are explained and treated according to the major theoretical perspectives. Important issues related to diagnosing, researching and treating mental disorders are also addressed. Prerequisite: one course in general or developmental psychology and junior status recommended.

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  • "The Pre-Physical Therapy program at CSS has thoroughly prepared me for Physical Therapy graduate school. My experience was enhanced by the knowledgeable faculty, the course curriculum, and the privilege to meet and work with DPT faculty and students."

    – Jordan Peratalo, '16