Admissions Office
The College of St. Scholastica
1200 Kenwood Avenue
Duluth, MN 55811
(218) 723-6046
(800) 249-6412
TTY/TDD: (218) 723-6790
admissions@css.edu

Brenda Fischer, Ed.D.
Department Chair
Tower Hall, Room 3103
(218) 723-5971
bfischer1@css.edu

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CSS/Churchill Teaching Immersion Program

CSS/Churchill Teaching Immersion Program

B.A./B.S. Middle/Secondary Education

Fast Facts: Middle/Secondary Education Major

  • The School of Education (SOE) fosters high academic standards, technological literacy, collaborative partnerships and a diverse learner perspective throughout its programs
  • Faculty members have significant K-12 teaching and administrative experience, allowing them to bring real-world perspective to their students
  • The SOE offers multiple placements for students, significant opportunities for professional development, collaborative consultation, mentoring relationships, common experiences for students, exposure to best practices for teaching and learning, and shared research projects
  • The SOE’s licensure programs are designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills and dispositions characteristic of effective teachers
  • Programs are rich in early and ongoing field experiences and reflective practice, which lead to more effective learning by our students and the students they work with
  • Middle/secondary (grades 5-12) licensure program completers apply for licensures in communication arts and literature (English), social studies, mathematics, life science (biology) or chemistry after completing academic majors in their areas of study, and all SOE program required courses
  • K-12 licensures are available in Spanish, instrumental music and vocal music
  • Curriculum is designed to correspond to the Minnesota Board of Teaching Standards of Effective Practice
  • The SOE's programs are nationally accredited by both the Teach Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) and the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), and have received continuing approval by the Minnesota Board of Teaching

Outcomes

Eleven of the 13 of the undergraduate teacher candidates who graduated and received their MN Teaching License in 2014-15 now have teaching jobs.

Program Requirements

  • Middle/Secondary and K-12 licensure requires completion of a teacher preparation major offered by one of the following departments: English, history, mathematics, biology or chemistry.
  • Spanish and music education programs result in a K-12 license.
  • The program's curriculum is designed to comply with recent (2012) changes in licensure requirements.

Student Teaching

Students in the secondary education program must complete 14 credits of student teaching in nearby middle and high schools during their senior year. Excellent local schools, both public and private, are happy to work with St. Scholastica students.

Sample curriculum

Here are some classes you could take as part of this major or minor. Please note that you would not necessarily need all of these courses to fulfill a major or minor. This list doesn't include general education courses. Be sure to create your course plan in consultation with your advisor.

Course Creation Center

Expand and Collapse Coursework

Expand and Collapse EDU 1505 - Introductory Field Experience

Includes classroom visits and tutoring in a local school. Details of time and location will be shared in EDU 1540. A $50 background check is required before students are allowed to enroll in this course. This field experience portion of the introductory course is taken concurrently with EDU 1540.

Expand and Collapse EDU 1540 - Introduction to Teaching

Introduction to schooling, teaching and the foundations of education. The major purpose is to help students clarify their thoughts and feelings about becoming a teacher. Topics include teachers, students, schools, teaching, curriculum, instruction, school governance, school finance, history of U.S. education, philosophy of education. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 1505.

Expand and Collapse EDU 2102 - Secondary Health & Drug Edu

Examines adolescent health issues and health problems within the context of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. Suicide, eating disorders, violence in school, family and relationships, sexual abuse, and STDs are explored by defining the issues and problems, identifying causal factors, looking at the effects on learning and discussing prevention as well as intervention and follow-up.

Expand and Collapse EDU 2210 - Educational Psychology

Examines children’s cognitive, social, moral, and emotional development as a function of their social and cultural context: the school. The course introduces theories of intelligence, learning, memory, motivation, and behavior. Application of theory to practice is emphasized, with a focus on critical thinking, metacognition, models of instruction, and classroom management approaches.

Expand and Collapse EDU 2215 - Edu Psyc Field Experience

This field experience involves observing and helping in local schools. The student will connect learning from EDU course(s) to the field experience and produce documentation of said learning. Note: Completing and passing the SOE background study is required prior to starting this field experience.

Expand and Collapse EDU 2300 - Human Relations

Provides students with an understanding of the importance of using multicultural approaches and diversity sensitive behaviors in the classroom. Students explore their own monocultural/multicultural socialization and examine their own assumptions and beliefs as they study the complex dynamics of the teaching/learning relationship. Topics include: the social construction of difference - race, class, gender, and sexual orientation; power, privilege, and the dehumanization process; the relationship between education and social justice.

Expand and Collapse EDU 2800 - Teaching Process I

Provides pre-service teachers with an understanding of the characteristics of a positive classroom environment in which literacy is emphasized. They examine how teaching/learning environments are influenced by: 1.) the relationship between teachers and their students 2.) the content and methodology chosen by teachers 3.) and the school, community, and governmental systems of which students and teachers are a part. Topics include: middle level education; lesson design; Minnesota Academic Standards; the relationship between objectives and assessments; the effective use of direct instruction, teacher modeling, and small group and individual assignments; formative assessments; questioning strategies; reading/writing strategies; multiple intelligences activities; large/small group discussions.

Expand and Collapse EDU 2805 - Field Experience Middle School

Introduces students to the culture of a middle school environment. They observe and assist teachers, interview school personnel, talk with students, and teach lessons that incorporate computer-based technology activities and reading strategies. Corequisite: EDU 2800.

Expand and Collapse EDU 3250 - Special Needs/Inclusion

Addresses the general education teacher‘s role in educating children and youth with exceptionalities. Students examine the social construction of disability and giftedness; universal design for learning; and relevant legislation, including the rights and responsibilities of families, educators, and students. They conduct a case analysis which includes referral and identification procedures; collaboration with special education teachers and families; and development of an individualized education plan (IEP). Students conduct research on a specific exceptionality area and demonstrate effective accommodations and inclusive strategies for the classroom. This course includes a field experience. Pre-requisite: EDU 2500 or EDU 2800 and Admission into the Education Program.

Expand and Collapse EDU 3620 - Classroom Assessment

An inquiry into the essence of the assessment process. The purpose and process of assessment will be investigated from a theoretical, phenomenological, personal, and experiential perspective. Topics include a brief history of assessment in education, underlying assumptions driving our assessment practices, the forms, purposes and effects of assessment used in classrooms today and new directions for assessment being advocated. This course is also listed as a benchmark course for the teaching portfolio. Students will share their whole portfolio with the education faculty to receive feedback.

Expand and Collapse EDU 3800 - Teaching Process II

Explores the dynamics among four dimensions of the teaching/learning relationship – teachers, students, course content, and methodology – with the emphasis this semester on content and methodology. Topics include: daily and long-term planning; the advantages and limitations associated with various instructional strategies; reading and writing strategies for use across the curriculum; assessment; the Minnesota Department of education Content Standards; multi-cultural, diversity-sensitive approaches to learning in the classroom; the integration of technology skills. Pre-requisites: EDU 2800, EDU 2805

Expand and Collapse EDU 4700 - Gr. 5-12 Student Teaching

Provides students with a practical teaching experience in a local middle school or high school under the supervision of a licensed teacher. This placement includes maintaining an environment conducive to learning; planning and teaching learning units (using both long-term and daily planning tools); developing assessments to evaluate students' learning; working with students with diverse learning needs; communicating effectively with students, parents/guardians, colleagues, and school support personnel; and participating in school activities.

Expand and Collapse EDU 4710 - Gr 5-12 Student Teaching Semnr

Helps students reflect on and deal with situations encountered in their student teaching experience. Attendance is required. Class discussions and reflections come from the daily challenges of being with students in a classroom setting. Time is also spent on discussing the job application, portfolio development, and licensure processes. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 4700.

Expand and Collapse Concentrations

Expand and Collapse Biology Teaching Preparation

Expand and Collapse BIO 2110 - Anatomy and Physiology I

Introductory study of anatomy and physiology of the vertebrate body with an emphasis on the human. Topics include an introduction to cells, tissues, and systems organization, osteology, fluid compartments, gross and microscopic anatomy, physiology of the circulatory system, body defense systems and the gross anatomy of musculature. 3 class hours, 3-hour lab. Prerequisite: BIO 1110 or BIO 1036.

Expand and Collapse BIO 2120 - Anatomy and Physiology II

Continuation of BIO 2110. Topics include gross and microscopic anatomy, physiology of the renal system, respiratory system, digestive system, nervous system and endocrine system. 3 class hours, 3-hour lab. Prerequisite: BIO 2110.

Expand and Collapse MTH 1111 - College Algebra

Topics include a brief review of elementary algebra, introduction to polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions using both symbolic and graphic approaches. Emphasis is on applications in a variety of disciplines and solutions of real-world problems. Students planning to continue mathematics receive appropriate preparation. Prerequisite: three years of high school math or instructor's permission.

Expand and Collapse NSC 3335 - Science Methods Field Experien

This experience introduces prospective teachers to the culture of the high school environment. Students observe and assist a biology or chemistry teacher, interview school personnel, talk with students, and teach technology-integrated lessons and content reading strategies in their subject area. Assessment strategies are observed and practiced. Co-requisite: NSC 3333

Expand and Collapse PSC 1202 - Cosmic Systems

A study of the universe as a set of interacting, evolving systems: galaxies, stars, the solar system and the Earth with its rocks, oceans and atmosphere. Study includes investigations of the matter-energy cycles in these systems and the effects of natural and human interventions upon them. In-class investigations and discovery activities and field trips are part of this course. Mainly for elementary and middle school teacher education students.

Expand and Collapse PSC 4750 -

Expand and Collapse Chemistry Teaching Preparation

Expand and Collapse CHM` 3240 -

Expand and Collapse NSC 3333 - Science Methods

This course is designed to assist prospective middle and high school science teachers successfully conduct and manage an inquiry-based science program. Emphasis is placed on how teachers can enhance learning and motivation for students at every stage of mental development. Topics include: technology in the science classroom, inquiry techniques, investigation techniques, demonstrations, science teaching reform, and specific science programs. Prospective teachers will plan, execute, and evaluate lesson plans with their peers in a public school setting.

Expand and Collapse NSC 3335 - Science Methods Field Experien

This experience introduces prospective teachers to the culture of the high school environment. Students observe and assist a biology or chemistry teacher, interview school personnel, talk with students, and teach technology-integrated lessons and content reading strategies in their subject area. Assessment strategies are observed and practiced. Co-requisite: NSC 3333

Expand and Collapse PSC 1202 - Cosmic Systems

A study of the universe as a set of interacting, evolving systems: galaxies, stars, the solar system and the Earth with its rocks, oceans and atmosphere. Study includes investigations of the matter-energy cycles in these systems and the effects of natural and human interventions upon them. In-class investigations and discovery activities and field trips are part of this course. Mainly for elementary and middle school teacher education students.

Expand and Collapse PSC 4150 - Science and Culture

An integration of concepts from the history, philosophy and sociology of the sciences. This course examines the interrelationship between science and its cultural matrix, the impact of science and technology upon society, and the complementary impact of societal factors on the development of science and the scientific community. Students are expected to do extensive reading of primary sources, reflective writing, and research papers.

Expand and Collapse English Teaching Preparation

Expand and Collapse CTA 1102 - Human Communication

Combines the areas of interpersonal communication and public speaking. Text lecture, discussion and laboratory exercises teach and reinforce effective interpersonal communication. Using interpersonal skills as a base, students will be introduced to more formal styles of presenting themselves and their ideas to larger public groups. Emphasis will be placed on clarifying purpose, audience analysis, and choice of supporting material, organization and delivery behaviors. Rhetorical skills will be developed through extemporaneous classroom experiences designed to inform or persuade.

Expand and Collapse CTA 1114 - Media Literacy

Analyzes the relationship between media and society through the interaction of technology, business, audiences, culture and government. Through lecture, discussion, field trips and other in-class activities, the course reviews the history and theories of mass communication as they relate to specific media.

Expand and Collapse EDM 3220 - Educ Res Children & Young Adlt

Provides students with knowledge and skill in the use of appropriate educational resources for the promotion of reading, listening, and viewing literacy. Students examine a wide variety of resources appropriate for use with K-12 students. Students learn to assess K-12 students' interests, goals and abilities.

Expand and Collapse ENG 2000 - Introduction to English Studies

This seminar offers prospective or recently declared English majors and minors a singular opportunity for discussion with like-minded students. In this required, foundational course, you will be introduced to the skills that characterize literary studies: rigorous close reading of texts in different genres, a critical vocabulary for further work in the field, and familiarity with the major theoretical approaches to literature (New Historicist, feminist, and deconstructivist, for example) as well as the development of their practical applications. You will also learn and employ basic literary research tools. The English Department recommends that you enroll in this required gateway course as a freshman or sophomore. (Please note that this course does not fulfill any of the General Education Pathways.)

Expand and Collapse ENG 2250 - Introduction to Poetry

Study of theory, forms and techniques of poetry with greatest emphasis on close study of selected poems. The course focuses on the major forms of poetry and the relationship of metaphor, symbol, tone and metrics to meaning.

Expand and Collapse ENG 2251 - Introduction to Fiction

Surveys celebrated prose fiction in a variety of cultural settings and idioms. Special attention is given to the forms and conventions of the novel and to the critical apparatus by which a reader may effectively analyze works of fiction. A typical reading list might include works by Austen, the Bronte sisters, Twain, Lawrence, Hurston, Orwell, Morrison, and Diaz.

Expand and Collapse ENG 2252 - Introduction to Drama

Study of theory, forms and dramatic conventions of plays taken from Greek, medieval, Renaissance, neoclassical, modern and contemporary periods.

Expand and Collapse ENG 3300 - Creative Writ: Fict & Nonfict

The reading of appropriate fiction and writing of short weekly pieces and a final short story. The class includes presentations on technique. Students need not be English majors. Work from this class is often published in the St. Scholastica literary journal, Out of Words.

Expand and Collapse ENG 3301 - Creative Writing: Poetry

Reading and discussion of poetry to learn technique from published poets. A final portfolio of poetry required which will include students' choice of their best work. Students need not be English majors. Work from class is often published in the St. Scholastica literary journal, Out of Words.

Expand and Collapse ENG 3310 - American Literature I:Beg-1900

Survey of American literature (poetry, essays, short stories and novels) beginning with Anne Bradstreet in the 17th century and including such authors as Irving, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Twain, et al. The course focuses on writers' responses to the political, social and literary concerns of the period, as well as to more general human concerns. Some attention to issues of form.

Expand and Collapse ENG 3311 - American Literature II: 1900 -

Survey of works by American poets and prose writers from the late 1800s through the 1990s. Poets include Dickinson, Frost, Williams, Stevens, Eliot, H.D., Marianne Moore, Plath, Wilbur and Rich. Novelists include Cather, Faulkner, Hemingway, Malamud, Walker, Morrison, Updike, Nabakov, O'Brien and Erdrich; American dramatists include Miller, O'Neill, Shepard, Albee and Williams. Short story writers include Anderson, Chopin, Cheever, O'Connor, Mason, Beattie and Oates.

Expand and Collapse ENG 3320 - British Literature I

Survey of English literature from the beginning until the late 18th century, including important and representative texts from the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the neo classic era. The course offers a view of literature within its historical and cultural context.

Expand and Collapse ENG 3321 - British Literature II

Survey of British literature from the end of the 18th century to the present day, including poetry, drama and prose from the Romantic period, the Victorian period and Modernist canon. The course offers a historical context so that students may understand the writers in relation to one another and to the world they inhabited.

Expand and Collapse ENG 4430 - English Language & Linguistics

Introduction to the history of the English language, theories of grammar and major topics in linguistics. Class discussions will focus on a variety of questions: how language got started, what it is, where English comes from, how English has changed, the extent to which there is such a thing as correct English, what dialects are and how they are significant, how words and their semantic values change, what the major approaches to grammar are, how people learn language, how the mind processes language, how linguistics can help teachers and how systems of writing arose and developed.

Expand and Collapse ENG 4440 - COM Arts / Literature Methods

Provides students with an integrated approach to the teaching of reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing skills in both middle level and high school settings. Topics include: teaching strategies that address the stages of the reading process and the writing process; teaching strategies that help students interpret and evaluate texts in a variety of ways; assessment; technology integration; selection of middle school and high school texts; lesson design and presentation; membership in professional organizations. Pre-requisites: EDU 2800 and EDU 2805.Co-requisite:ENG 4445.

Expand and Collapse ENG 4440 - COM Arts / Literature Methods

Provides students with an integrated approach to the teaching of reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing skills in both middle level and high school settings. Topics include: teaching strategies that address the stages of the reading process and the writing process; teaching strategies that help students interpret and evaluate texts in a variety of ways; assessment; technology integration; selection of middle school and high school texts; lesson design and presentation; membership in professional organizations. Pre-requisites: EDU 2800 and EDU 2805.Co-requisite:ENG 4445.

Expand and Collapse ENG 4445 - English Methods Field Experience

Introduces students to the culture of a high school environment. They observe and assist teachers, interview school personnel, talk with students, and teach lessons that incorporate computer-based technology activities and content area reading strategies. Co-requisite: ENG 4440.

Expand and Collapse ENG 4445 - English Methods Field Experience

Introduces students to the culture of a high school environment. They observe and assist teachers, interview school personnel, talk with students, and teach lessons that incorporate computer-based technology activities and content area reading strategies. Co-requisite: ENG 4440.

Expand and Collapse History/Social Studies Teaching Preparation

Expand and Collapse GCL 2231 - Cultural Anthropology

Addresses concepts, methods, and theories exploring social and cultural life across time and space, including the changing concept of culture itself. The course is an introduction to ethnographic fieldwork methods and to the practice of anthropology, with attention to the impact of contemporary social forces on the diverse societies that make up the modern world.

Expand and Collapse HIS 1101 - World History I

An introduction to world history from the origins of civilization to 1500. The course focuses on the societies and cultures of Eurasia: Southwest Asia (the Middle East), India, Persia, China, Greece and Rome, and Europe. Major themes include the founding and development of the world's great religions; political ideas, institutions and practices; law and legal institutions; society and economy; war, conquest and empire; the expression and meaning of human dignity in varied contexts; and the richness and diversity of human experience and aspiration in the foundational eras of the world's civilizations.

Expand and Collapse HIS 1102 - World History II

An introduction to world history since 1500. The course surveys the societies and cultures of Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Americas. Themes include Europe's impact on the world, modernization and tradition, imperialism and empire, the great ideologies of the modern era, and growing consciousness of human rights and world citizenship. The course traces global patterns of change and continuity, while striving to understand the particular perspectives of distinct world cultures and the meanings these cultures have given to their historical experiences.

Expand and Collapse HIS 1110 - History of the United States 1

This course examines the history of the region that eventually became the United States from pre-European contact through 1865. Major themes include: encounters between Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans in the formation of colonial North America; the social, political, economic, religious, and cultural forces that shaped various colonies; the origins and evolution of slavery and racism; the movement for Independence; the development of urbanization and industrialization in the North and the entrenchment of slavery in the South; sectional crisis and party politics; and the Civil War.

Expand and Collapse HIS 1111 - History of the United States II

This course explores major themes in United States history since 1865. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of wars on American society and culture; the roles of immigrants and immigration in shaping American identity and distinctiveness; how the nature and meaning of work have changed in a period that witnessed heavy industrialization and de-industrialization; movements for equality and civil rights; the cultural ferment of the Jazz Age and the 1960s; the challenges of the Depression; and the complexities of foreign policy in a global era.

Expand and Collapse HIS 2201 - American Indian History I

Political, economic, social and cultural development of the American Indian from pre-contact through conquest.

Expand and Collapse HIS 2202 - American Indian History II

Political, economic, social and cultural development of the American Indian from conquest to the present.

Expand and Collapse HIS 3206 - Historiography/Hist Methods

Introduction and hands-on survey of the concepts, methods, sources, and tools involved in the writing of history and in other forms of historiography. Includes a review of major historiographical trends, past and present.

Expand and Collapse HIS 3214 - The World Since 1945

An introduction to world history from the end of World War II to the present. Major themes include the origins, course and end of the Cold War; the Soviet Union from Stalin to Gorbachev; China under Mao and his successors; decolonization, nationalism and the retreat from empire; the Vietnam War; Africa since independence; democracy, dictatorship and intervention in Latin America; war and peace in the Middle East; the Islamic world; human rights and the struggle for justice; the role of the United States in the contemporary world; and the meaning and responsibilities of global citizenship.

Expand and Collapse HIS 3327 - U.S. Economic History

Uses historical events as case studies for basic economic principles. Students use historical analysis to investigate economic concepts and use economic theories to analyze U.S. history. Requirements: develop critical thinking skills so that students can evaluate the influences and trends that have shaped the economic institutions and events of the United States, both past and present.

Expand and Collapse HUM 1174 - Introduction to Geography

A topical overview of physical, cultural, economic and regional geography. The course is designed for those with little or no background in the discipline. Required for SSC majors.

Expand and Collapse POL 2001 - Introduction to Political Sci

Introduction to the discipline of political science and the nature of political discourse, institutions and organizations. Topics range from politics and culture to terrorism and international relations.

Expand and Collapse POL 3331 - American Government

Study of national government and development of form and functions of the federal system. Topics range from constitutional issues to public policy debates.

Expand and Collapse PSY 1105 - General Psychology

Designed to provide an overview of concepts, methods, and applications of psychology. Topics include psychology as a science, research methods, perspectives of psychology, sub disciplines of psychology, biological foundations of behavior, developmental psychology, sensation and perception, learning, memory, thinking, language development, intelligence testing, personality, psychological disorders, psychological and biomedical therapies for psychological disorders and social psychology.

Expand and Collapse SSC 3900 - Social Sciences Methods

Introduction to social studies education in both middle school and high school settings. Topics include the nature and purposes of social studies education, the social studies curriculum, planning and designing a social studies unit and course, community resources, assessment, classroom management, the Minnesota Graduation Rule, and clinical experience in a social studies classroom. Students also spend time with teachers new to the profession and participate in mock interviews for social studies teaching positions. Pre- or co-requisite: EDU 3800.

Expand and Collapse SSC 3905 - Social Studies Mthd Fld Experi

Introduces students to the culture of a high school environment. They observe and assist a social studies teacher, interview school personnel, talk with students, and teach technology-integrated social studies lessons and content area reading strategies. Assessment practices are observed and practiced. Co-requisite: SSC 3900.

Expand and Collapse Music Teaching Preparation

Expand and Collapse MUS 1101 - Music Theory I

Basic musicianship course, including study of materials and language of music: pitch, rhythm, meter, intervals, chords, part-writing, analysis of masterworks. Approach is from both conceptual and performance standpoint: hearing, writing, playing, singing.

Expand and Collapse MUS 1102 - Music Theory II

Continuation of MUS 1101. Prerequisite: MUS 1101.

Expand and Collapse MUS 1302 - Music Literature

Introductory course dealing with the great music of the world and its history, makers, styles. Prerequisite or taken concurrently: MUS 1101.

Expand and Collapse MUS 1421 - Beginning Voice Class

Class voice for those who have not studied voice privately before. Course is open to majors whose performance area is other than voice and to nonmajors.

Expand and Collapse MUS 2111 - Advanced Harmony

Advanced study of harmonic practice as applied by composers from the late 19th century to the present. Prerequisite: MUS 1102

Expand and Collapse MUS 2112 - Form and Analysis

The study of form in Western art music . Prerequisite: MUS 2111

Expand and Collapse MUS 2251 - Conducting

Study of conducting technique, score study and responsibilities of a conductor of an ensemble. Prerequisite: MUS 1102.

Expand and Collapse MUS 2252 - Intro to Music Education

Provides an overview of the field of music education and licensure requirements. Corequisite: EDU 2800.

Expand and Collapse MUS 2297 - Sophomore Recital

Sophomore recital may be partial. Recital permission must be passed a minimum of four weeks prior to the date of the recital.

Expand and Collapse MUS 2298 - Keyboard/Sightsinging Profcncy

Required of all Music majors. Exam includes the following skills at the keyboard: major and minor scales, memorized piece, sight reading, improvisation, transposition, accompanying. Exam also includes sightsinging.

Expand and Collapse MUS 2411 - String Instruments I

Beginning through intermediate techniques for playing violin-family string instruments. Focus is on one instrument with basic skills developed on other instruments. Study includes a survey of instructional materials. Three class hours per week.

Expand and Collapse MUS 2412 - Woodwind Instruments I

Beginning techniques for playing woodwind instruments. Student studies one instrument in depth for six weeks, then a second the next six weeks with the remaining time spent gaining a general knowledge of range, techniques and characteristic sounds of each of the other instruments. Study includes a survey of instructional materials. Three class hours per week.

Expand and Collapse MUS 2413 - Brass & Percussion Instruments

Beginning techniques for playing brass and percussion instruments. Focus is on one instrument with general understanding of the range, techniques and characteristic sounds of each of the other instruments. Study includes a survey of instructional materials. Three class hours per week.

Expand and Collapse MUS 3111 - Counterpoint

The study of 16th, 18th, and 20th-century contrapuntal procedures. Prerequisite: MUS 1102

Expand and Collapse MUS 3112 - Orchestration

Introduction to arranging and/or composing for strings, winds and percussion. Prerequisites: MUS 1102, 2411, and 2412 or 2413.

Expand and Collapse MUS 3298 - Music Education Proficiency

Required of all Music Education majors. Exam includes basic proficiency in improvisation, on recorder, and on a fretted string instrument such as guitar or ukulele.

Expand and Collapse MUS 3309 - World Music

Study of art, folk, and popular music of both Eastern and Western cultures and relationship of the music to the history, geography and society of the region. No prerequisites or musical experience necessary.

Expand and Collapse MUS 3310 - Hist Medieval/Renaissance MUS

Study of compositional techniques, notation, forms and performance practice in the medieval and Renaissance eras. Relationship of music to the social and political thought of the time is included. Prerequisites: MUS 1102 and 1302.

Expand and Collapse MUS 3311 - Hist Baroque/Classical MUS

Study of music of 1600-1800. Course includes study of suite, concerto, cantata, opera, fugue and other Baroque genres; study of sonata, symphony, concerto, opera, chamber music of the classical era; analysis of performance practice; relationship of music to the social and political thought of the time. Prerequisites: MUS 1102 and 1302.

Expand and Collapse MUS 3312 - Hist Romantic/20th Cent MUS

Study of music from 1800 to the present. Course includes study of harmonic developments, compositional techniques, forms, media; relation of music to social and political, literary and graphic arts developments. Prerequisites: MUS 1102 and 1302.

Expand and Collapse MUS 3411 - Music Technology

Study of current technology for use in teaching music.

Expand and Collapse MUS 3412 - Vocal Pedagogy

Study of vocal performance pedagogy and vocal health, including the child voice and the changing voice. Prerequisite: MUS 1421 or MUS 1700 Sec. 24 Voice Lessons

Expand and Collapse MUS 3413 - Advanced Choral Conducting and Literature

Develops skills in conducting and rehearsal techniques plus knowledge of literature and materials for use in teaching choral music. Prerequisite: MUS 2251 and 2252.

Expand and Collapse MUS 3414 - Advanced Instrumental/Conducti

Develops skills in conducting and rehearsal techniques plus knowledge of literature and materials for use in teaching instrumental music. Prerequisite: MUS 2251 and 2252.

Expand and Collapse MUS 3415 - Teaching General Music

Develops knowledge and skills needed in order to teach general music. Prerequisite: MUS 2252.

Expand and Collapse MUS 3416 - Advanced Orchestration & Bands

Develops skills in composing and arranging for diverse groups represented by instrumental students in grades 5-12. Prerequisite: MUS 3112.

Expand and Collapse MUS 3417 - Choral Arranging

Develops skills in composing and arranging for diverse groups represented by choral and general music students in grades K-12. Prerequisite: MUS 3112.

Expand and Collapse MUS 4297 - Senior Recital

Recital permission must be passed a minimum of four weeks prior to the date of the recital.

Expand and Collapse Spanish Teaching Preparation

Expand and Collapse ENG 2280 -

Expand and Collapse GCL 2050 - Introduction to Mexico

This course focuses on understanding the social and cultural differences between the United States and Mexico. Particular attention is given to the social goals of the Mexican Revolution and how Mexico has attempted to address or ignore these goals while striving to develop its economy and society in the shadow of the world's remaining superpower. Learning activities include readings, guest lectures by Mexican social activists and academics, excursions to sites of historical and cultural importance, reflection papers, and group discussion. The course is a required component of the Semestre en México program and is taught in English.

Expand and Collapse SPN 2101 - Intermediate Spanish I

Intermediate course that deals with the more sophisticated elements of Spanish grammar and communication. All four skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing - are emphasized. Prerequisite: Placement exam, SPN 1104 or consent of instructor.

Expand and Collapse SPN 2102 - Intermediate Spanish II

Continuation of SPN 2101. Prerequisite: Placement exam, SPN 2101, or consent of instructor.

Expand and Collapse SPN 2150 - Intermediate Spanish I

Intermediate conversational Spanish. Taught as a component of the Semestre en México Program. Prerequisite: SPN 1104 or consent of instructor.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3101 - Advanced Spanish in Context I

This course is part of a two-semester in-depth examination of Spanish grammar with substantial vocabulary building. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are all practiced in conjunction with cultural and situational contexts. Prerequisite: SPN 2102 or consent of instructor.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3102 - Advanced Spanish in Context II

This course is part of a two-semester in-depth examination of Spanish grammar with substantial vocabulary building. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are all practiced in conjunction with cultural and situational contexts. Prerequisite: SPN 2102 or consent of instructor.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3150 - Spanish Conversation

Intensive conversational Spanish. Taught as a component of the Semestre en México Program. Prerequisite: SPN 2012 or consent of instructor.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3440 - Spanish Teaching Methods

This course is required for students pursuing a Minnesota K-12 license to teach Spanish. Explores various techniques for teaching Spanish, curriculum development, instructional planning strategies, and assessment of student progress. This course is taken concurrently with SPN 3445. Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education program.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3445 - Spanish Methods Field Experience

Provides students with a practical teaching experience in a local elementary, middle, or high school under the supervision of a licensed teacher.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3514 - Hispanic Poetry

Opportunity to study the major poets of the Hispanic world. The course deals with a different writer each time it is offered. The international significance of each poet, his/her influence on the Hispanic world and the specific cultural importance of these writers is examined. Prerequisite: SPN 2101 or consent of instructor.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3516 - Hispanic Short Stories

Introduction to literature in Spanish. The course deals with writers from Spain and Spanish America and chiefly from the 20th century. Students will become acquainted with major Spanish-speaking writers and with their way of seeing and depicting the world. Good reading skills needed. Prerequisite: SPN 2102 or consent of instructor.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3601 - Civilization: Spain

Overview of the rich history and culture of Spain, beginning with the earliest inhabitants and moving to the 21st century, highlighting major events. Good reading and speaking skills needed. Prerequisite: SPN 2102 or consent of instructor.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3602 - Civilization: Latin America

Overview of the rich history and culture of Latin America, primarily of the Spanish-speaking regions. Begins with the native traditions of the Aztec, Mayan and Inca inhabitants and moves to the 21st century, highlighting major events. Good reading and speaking skills needed. Prerequisite: SPN 2102 or consent of instructor.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3603 - Hispanic Culture in the US

Students explore the history, culture, and society of Spanish-speaking peoples in the US. Topics such as immigration, acculturation, cultural transformation, and the relationships between Hispanics and non-Hispanic groups in the US are all addressed. Prerequisite: SPN 3601 or SPN 3602, or consent of instructor.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3901 - Hispanic Women Writers

Examination of Hispanic women writers who best represent their cultures and who explore women's historic roles in the Hispanic world and their efforts to achieve a place in this society.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3930 - Mitos y Leyendas en Español

In this course students will read and analyze myths and legends from the Spanish-speaking world, paying attention to the meanings that myths and legends provide for both individuals and societies. Students practice Spanish listening and speaking skills as they learn the techniques of oral storytelling. Grammar review and vocabulary building are also built into this course.

Expand and Collapse SPN 3951 - Masterpieces of Hispanic Lit

Opportunity to read some of the major literary works written in Spanish. While the content of the course changes periodically, the guiding principle is the inclusion of as much variety as possible from the different genres, historical periods, countries and sub-cultures. Prerequisite: At least one 3000 level course (except SPN 3303) passed with a B average or consent of instructor.

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  • "We have engaged professors who connect personally with students, content area classes that add variety to the learning experience and many opportunities for field experience. Those are the aspects I love about this major.”

    – Adam Wilson, ‘14