Global, Cultural & Language Studies

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Program Facts

  • Exposes students to a variety of cultures and academic disciplines while emphasizing critical thinking skills and social justice.
  • Explores such topics as culture, place, power, identity, globalization, development, environmental concerns, public policy and diplomacy.
  • Because culture and language are inter-related, students study a language while at the same time exploring literature, the arts, history, anthropology, economics and politics.
  • Students receive theoretical preparation throughout  the program and must complete an integrative research project  designed to help prepare them for life after college.

Program Requirements

Major: 44 credits
Minor: 20 credits

Internships

Global, cultural and language students are required to participate in an experiential learning placement, and have several off-campus options from which to choose. Off-campus programs that provide global, cultural and language majors with internships or service-learning experiences include the Higher Education Consortium for Urban Affairs, and the Washington Semester at American University.

Careers

Students with a Major in Global, Cultural and Language Studies are well prepared to work at governmental and non-governmental organizations in the fields of law, human rights, public policy or private business. Graduates have found employment in these fields at historical societies, non-profit organizations, and in educational institutions.

Others choose to pursue graduate study in economics, global studies, political science, law, medicine, cultural studies, or language and culture instruction at national and international institutions of higher education.

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St. Scholastica was named on the list of Top 200 Colleges for Native Americans by Winds of Change magazine.

  • "Global, cultural and language Studies taught me to ... ask the uncomfortable questions and try to seek out the just answers."

    – Michael Bach, ‘10