Current Students | M.S. Project Management

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Project Management curriculum overview

Course sequence

The curriculum includes several courses requiring prerequisite constraints. As a result, the sequence students complete courses in the curriculum is important. 

Students entering the program in the Spring semester will complete the program in two years while students entering the program in the Fall semester may complete the program in five semesters (less than two years).

Course Sequence for a fall start

Course sequence for summer start


Course descriptions

CIS 6101 Leadership Communications (3 credits). An examination of the importance of leadership theories and styles, and the essential importance of communication. Oral and written communication methods will be studied to determine how effective communication is integral to the success of initiatives. Topics include communicating complex ideas, collaboration in a team environment, and using communication to lead a team and work effectively with complex interpersonal and team processes. Prerequisite: None

PRM 6110 Project Management Essentials I (3 credits). The first of two survey courses examining project management processes. This course provides an examination of the processes used in initiating and planning projects and the tools and techniques used to support these processes. Students study and apply current techniques to obtain project sponsorship and resources, develop project metrics, and prepare detailed plans to guide project execution. Prerequisite: CIS 6101

PRM 6115 Project Management Essentials II (3 credits). The second of two survey courses examining project management processes. This course provides an examination of the processes used in executing, controlling, and closing projects and the tools and techniques used to support these processes. Students study and apply current techniques used to lead project teams, engage stakeholders, monitor and evaluate projects, deliver effective results, and close projects. Prerequisites: CIS 6101 and PRM 6110

PRM 6119 Strategic Decision Making (3 credits). An examination of the methods used to make informed and ethical strategic decisions. The course provides a review of qualitative and quantitative methods applied to the decision making process. Topics include goal setting, systems thinking, cost-benefit analysis, contingency planning, decision trees, risk assessment, and decision evaluations. Prerequisite: None

PRM 6225 Procurement and Budget Management (3 credits). A study of methods used for developing and maintaining project budgets and the procuring the products and services supporting projects. Topics include project financial estimates, project budgeting, expense reporting, vendor relations, and contract management. Prerequisites: PRM 6110 and PRM 6115

PRM 6234 Project Risk and Quality Management (3 credits). An in-depth study on the methods, techniques, and tools used to measure, evaluate, and control project risk and project quality. Students learn and apply techniques to identify, mitigate, and communicate project risk and measure, monitor, and assess the quality of the project deliverables. Prerequisites: PRM 6110 and PRM 6115

PRM 6242 Emerging Topics in Project Management (3 credits). Exploration of current and future trends in the field project management. Scholarly and professional literature will be reviewed in the context of existing and traditional project management practices to identify potential changes to the profession and practices and reflect upon the impact of these changes. Prerequisites: PRM 6110 and PRM 6115

PRM 6556 Organizational Change Leadership (3 credits). A study of projects in the context of the organization. Students will apply the project portfolio management approach to view projects in terms of contribution of value to the organization. The course also provides an in-depth discussion on the methods used to ensure projects deliver effective and enduring change. Prerequisites: PRM 6234

PRM 6567 Global and Cultural Competency (3 credits). Exploration of the business, cultural, and economic environments of organizations and societies. Students are provided with an awareness and appreciation of the similarities and differences of cultures across the globe and the means to effectively and ethically operate in the global environment. Prerequisites: CIS 6101

PRM 6586 Leading Global and Distributed Teams (3 credits). An in-depth study on leading project teams where members exist in multiple locations and in locations across the world. The course provides insight into effective communication and management of distributed teams and discusses effective practices for motivating, guiding, and evaluating project teams. Prerequisites: PRM 6567

CIS 6795 Research and Writing (3 credits). A preparatory course for the capstone project. Students prepare a project proposal while refining research and scholarly writing skills. Topics include defining a problem statement, APA publication guidelines, writing a literature review, and developing a scholarly voice. The course concludes with the development and approval of a formal proposal outlining the purpose and scope of the capstone project. Prerequisites: CIS 6101, PRM 6110, PRM 6115, and PRM 6119

PRM 6800 Capstone Project I (2 credits). Working with an assigned project advisor, students assimilate knowledge from prior courses with findings from research in the current literature of the selected topical area. The findings from the literature research are integrated in the development of a project introduction and literature review. Prerequisite: CIS 6795

PRM 6900 Capstone Project II (2 credits). Working with an assigned project advisor, students complete the remaining work on the capstone by synthesizing a solution to the defined problem. The course concludes with an approval, publication, and oral presentation of the capstone project. Prerequisite: PRM 6800.