Dr. Donald S. Lopez

Dr. Donald S. Lopez
Chair, Department of Asian Languages & Cultures
Professor of Buddhist & Tibetan Studies
University of Michigan
http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/

Donald S. Lopez, Jr. was born in Washington, D. C. in 1952 and was educated at the University of Virginia, receiving a doctorate in Religious Studies in 1982.  After teaching at Middlebury College, he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan in 1989, where he is currently Arthur E. Link Distinguished University Professor of Buddhist and Tibetan Studies in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures.  He is the author or editor of more than twenty books, which have been translated into French, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Korean, and Chinese. His books include Buddhism in Practice (Princeton, 1995), Elaborations on Emptiness: Uses of the Heart Sutra (Princeton, 1996), Curators of the Buddha: The Study of Buddhism Under Colonialism (Chicago, 1995), Prisoners of Shangri-La: Tibetan Buddhism and the West (Chicago, 1998), The Story of Buddhism (Harper San Francisco, 2001), A Modern Buddhist Bible (Beacon, 2002), Buddhist Scriptures (Penguin Classics, 2004), Critical Terms for the Study of Buddhism (Chicago, 2005), The Madman's Middle Way: Reflections on Reality of the Tibetan Monk Gendun Chopel (Chicago, 2005), Buddhism and Science: A Guide for the Perplexed (Chicago, 2008), and In the Forest of Faded Wisdom: 104 Poems of Gendun Chopel (Chicago, 2009).  He has also served as editor of the Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies.  In 2002-03 he served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Getty Research Institute. In 1998 he was named Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, the University of Michigan's highest award for undergraduate teaching. In 2000 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2005, he was named a Distinguished University Professor. In 2007, he received the John H. D'Arms Faculty Award for Distinguished Graduate Mentoring in the Humanities. He currently serves as chair of the Michigan Society of Fellows and as chair of the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures.