Natural, Social, and Physical Sciences

Natural Science and Social Sciences Majors, B.A.

Dean: Gerald Henkel-Johnson, Psy.D.

Two school majors culminating in a bachelor of arts degree are offered by the School of Sciences, one in Natural Sciences and the other in Social Sciences. These majors afford students an opportunity to explore a wide breadth of the natural or social sciences or to arrange a course of study in fields that are not represented by current majors offered by departments in the School of Sciences.

Although a degree in Natural or Social Sciences may be appropriate for entry-level employment, students should be aware that the school major is not intended to provide sufficient depth of preparation for admission to a graduate program in a specific natural or social science. Students who wish to earn a the natural or social sciences degree are strongly encouraged to meet with the Dean of the School of Sciences in the fall semester of the sophomore year to evaluate the appropriateness of the degree for their long-term career goals.

The school major is intended for students who are not seeking a baccalaureate degree in any other program at the College. For this reason, the school major ordinarily is not an appropriate second major. Students earning a bachelor of arts degree at the College must earn 128 semester credits (with a minimum of 42 credits at the 3000-level or higher), satisfy the Benedictine Liberal Arts Education Program, and fulfill the requirements for a major.

Natural Sciences major

The school major in Natural Sciences requires a minimum of 36 credits in courses that carry a BIO, CHM, MTH, NSC, or PSC prefix. Of the 36 credits, 20 must be earned in one natural science department and 16 credits must be chosen from courses at the 3000-level or higher. The balance of credits needed for graduation should be selected in consultation with the student's academic adviser and the dean to ensure that the student's individual educational and career objectives can be attained.

Social Sciences major

The school major in Social Sciences requires a minimum of 36 credits in courses that carry a PSY, SOC, GER, ECN, or POL prefix. At the dean's discretion, courses with other prefixes that have a strong social science emphasis may be counted toward the major. The 36 credits must be distributed such that 16 credits are at the 3000-level or higher, at least 16 credits are earned in one department, and at least 8 credits are earned in a second department. The B.A. in Social Sciences may provide good preparation for graduate work in many professions such as law, management, and social work. Students preparing for professional study should work closely with their advisors to select an appropriate sequence of courses. The B.A. in Social Sciences does not provide sufficient depth to prepare for graduate study in any of the social sciences.

A student seeking to earn a B.A. in the Natural or Social Sciences should first schedule an appointment with the dean of the School of Sciences or a designated adviser to discuss the appropriateness of the natural science or social science major and a proposed course of study. Students submit the application to major form and an essay to the dean. The essay should explain how earning a B.A. in Natural or Social Sciences advances the educational and career goals of the student.

Admission and retention

Students admitted to a School of Sciences major a student must be in good academic standing at the College and  shall earn a minimum of C- in all courses applied toward the major to be retained. A cumulative grade point average of 2.0 is required for graduation.

School of Science major outcomes

A student graduating with a B.A. in Natural or Social Sciences from The College of St. Scholastica will:

1. Understand the broad relationships and connections among the disciplines studied.

2. Understand the most basic and essential principles of at least one discipline.

3 Communicate his or her analysis of a problem or evaluation of a proposition accurately and intelligibly from the view of a natural or social scientist, as appropriate.

Dual Degree Engineering B.A./B.S.

For students who believe that their lives will be enriched by liberal studies, but who also wish to pursue an engineering degree, the Dual Degree Program provides an opportunity to earn two undergraduate degrees in a period of five or six years. In the Dual Degree Program, students attend The College of St. Scholastica for three years, taking introductory courses in science, mathematics and humanities and then transfer to the Institute of Technology (IT) of the University of Minnesota for an additional two or (more often) three years to take engineering courses. At the time that the student qualifies for the B.S. degree in Engineering at the IT, she or he will also be awarded a  B.A. degree in the Natural Sciences from The College of St. Scholastica.

The IT offers programs in aerospace, biomedical, bio systems and agricultural, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, geological, materials science and mechanical engineering.

Requirements and procedures for B.A./B.S. Dual Degree Program:

  1. The student will complete a minimum of 96 credits at The College of St. Scholastica, to include: all of the General Education requirements; the following courses: CHM 1110,1120; PSC 2001, 2002; MTH 2221, 2222, 3321, 3322,  3323; CHM 3460,3470 for chemical engineering; CIS 2085 for all programs except civil, geological engineering and materials science. In order to complete the necessary coursework for this program, entering students should be able to successfully complete MTH 2221: Calculus I and CHM 1110: General Chemistry I the first semester at CSS.  Students who are not prepared to take these classes immediately without remedial coursework generally are poor candidates for the Dual Degree Engineering Program.
  2. In the first year of residency at St. Scholastica, the student should secure from the dean of the School of Sciences the IT brochures for Dual Degree and for the student's desired engineering program, and should carefully note the lower-division requirements for that program, making every effort to achieve as many of those requirements at St. Scholastica as possible.
  3. The IT recommends that Dual Degree candidates take the lower-division engineering courses at IT during summer sessions if at all possible. If it is not possible to do this, the student will have to plan on three years at IT to complete these preliminary requirements in addition to the upper-division courses. Students are encouraged to check the University of Minnesota-Duluth Catalog to see if any of these courses are available there, and/or to take summer courses at the IT.
  4. A minimum GPA, particularly in science and math courses, of 2.8 is required for consideration for IT admission.
  5. The student will apply for IT admission during the third year of residency at St. Scholastica, ideally between Nov. 1 and Jan 31. Special application forms are available from the dean of the School of Sciences.
  6. The student will complete an engineering program at IT. At that time, the St. Scholastica degree will be granted. Application for the St. Scholastica degree should be made in January of the year in which the student expects to receive his/her degree from the university.

Dual Degree Engineering B.A./M.S.

Students who wish to complete their undergraduate degree at The College of St. Scholastica in Chemistry, Biology or Mathematics may then apply for admission to appropriate engineering graduate programs at the Institute of Technology, if they have completed the Dual Degree course requirements listed in the previous section. See the dean of the School of Sciences for further information on this option.

Physical Sciences

Courses offered in this unit serve one of two purposes: to provide experiences in those areas of science which are necessary or useful to major in other fields or to provide general or interdisciplinary courses in the physical sciences which may be elected by students who desire to increase their knowledge of science. There is no Physical Science major or minor. Administratively, the unit is part of the Chemistry and Physical Science Department.

Chair: Paul Stein, Ph.D.

 

Physical Sciences

Courses offered in this unit serve one of two purposes: to provide experiences in those areas of science that are necessary or useful to major in other fields or to provide general or interdisciplinary courses in the physical sciences that may be elected by students who desire to increase their knowledge of science. There is no Physical Science major or minor. Administratively, the unit is part of the Chemistry and Physical Science Department.

Chair: Paul Stein, Ph.D.